Decentralising Social Media platforms

This podcast discusses the emergence of a new generation of distributed network social media platforms such as Minds and Synereo. Can these new platforms tackle the centralised structure of social media giant Facebook?

Information in the podcast was sourced from hyperlinked sites in this article.

Forbes,

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10 thoughts on “Decentralising Social Media platforms

  1. Hey Eddie! I really liked how you talked about Facebook as a centralised social platform and the notion that the users produce content as a kind of free labour for the elite sitting at the top. I have never heard of Minds or Synereo before so it will be interesting to see what they are like. Thanks for the info and links!

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  2. Hi There,

    I really enjoyed your post this week! I can tell that you put in a lot of research. I agree that privacy is such a huge issue in regards to Facebook especially. When we were young we were a little bit naive and had no idea that all the content that we posted, shared, tweeted was stored for the whole world to continue to see, regardless of us ‘deleting’ it. Sometimes I still wonder why I still use Facebook when it has such huge power over the content I post. But an interesting topic that stems into another area of the cyberspace is how we use it to communicate. The online world has completely revolutionised the way we chat to other people, whether it be among family members or friends from anywhere around the world.

    So perhaps your explanation of a decentralised network such as Synereo is the answer to the privacy issues that currently surround social media sites like Facebook.

    One final comment, to enhance your blog I would suggest putting some hyperlinks in so that readers can continue there journey through your writing – for example you could include a hyperlink of a webpage that explains a little bit more about WikiLeaks.

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    1. Thanks for the reply charlotte. I agree totally with your point about how we use cyberspace (especially Facebook) to communicate. I know i am quite addicted to using Facebook to chat with friends. It is a revolutionary platform with a lot of upside but I think it would be great if decentralised sites i mentioned in the post could incorporate the positive features of Facebook into the new decentralised platforms. Thanks for the heads up about hyperlinks too. 🙂

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      1. No worries – I do apologise I wasn’t supposed to put Wikileaks down as the example. I guess you could relate Wikileaks however to yours post through the issue with privacy which Facebook seems to have. Yes I did not know about the decentralised sites you mentioned so thank you for that. I learnt something!

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      2. “Revolutionary”? How different is it to other communication platforms? Big ones before it: AOL / MSN. I would agree that the uptake and use of Facebook is astonishing, and it has become the online profile for many. But not revolutionary.

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      3. Facebook created a platform that developers could build on to write apps and integrate with other sites. I am unaware of anyone else doing that before facebook. Also, Facebook may not have devised IM or, the profile, likes or many other features but it did create an online community, or ‘social network’ in the sense that before you even post anything on Facebook your page would be filled with the conversations of other friends.. Creating instant, social community

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      4. Yes, I guess Facebook augmented the internet. It shifted many communication practices and provided the ability to proliferate everywhere. I’m still hesitant to regard it as revolutionary, but that’s an issue of semantics.

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  3. Hi There,

    I really enjoyed your post this week! I can tell that you put in a lot of research. I agree that privacy is such a huge issue in regards to Facebook especially. When we were young we were a little bit naive and had no idea that all the content that we posted, shared, tweeted was stored for the whole world to continue to see, regardless of us ‘deleting’ it. Sometimes I still wonder why I still use Facebook when it has such huge power over the content I post. But an interesting topic that stems into another area of the cyberspace is how we use it to communicate. The online world has completely revolutionised the way we chat to other people, whether it be among family members or friends from anywhere around the world.

    So perhaps your explanation of a decentralised network such as Synereo is the answer to the privacy issues that currently surround social media sites like Facebook.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thanks Eddie, I knew very little about existing decentralised networks. It’s really a privacy and ethical debate in regards to Facebook profiting off of its users. It turns the value of content sharing and creation into free labour. Why do so many use Facebook? Collective research can reveal why they perform certain actions on Facebook: https://blog.bufferapp.com/psychology-of-facebook, but why do they do this ON Facebook. What limits us from switching to Synereo?

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    1. You pose an Interesting question there. Thanks Paul. The simple fact that people many people do not understand the benefits of a decentralised platform may inhibit Facebook users desire to switch platforms? I think there is probably a number of reasons why people tend to use Facebook such as’s its effective marketing, sheep mentality, established user base etc.

      Thanks for the link. Perhaps understanding why people use Facebook can help understand how to avoid it.

      Liked by 1 person

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